Impact

Human Trafficking 

Victims of child trafficking can be used and abused over and over. A $32 billion-a-year industry, human trafficking is on the rise and is in all 50 states (U.S. Government) 4.5 Million of trafficked persons are sexually exploited. Up to 300,000 Americans under 18 are lured into the commercial sex trade every year. 

The International Labor Organization estimates that there are 4.5 million people trapped in forced sexual exploitation globally. 


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Teen Pregnancy in the United States. In 2015, a total of 229,715 babies were born to women aged 15–19 years, for a birth rate of 22.3 per 1,000 women in this age group. This is another record low for U.S. teens and a drop of 8% from 2014. Birth rates fell 9% for women aged 15–17 years and 7% for women aged 18–19 years.May 9, 2017

Reports indicate that there are approximately 1 million teenagers in America that become pregnant each year. Of those, 78% are unintended. Of all the teenage women that become pregnant, 35% choose to have an abortion rather than bear a child.

 

 

 

 
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SEXUAL ABUSE

Child Sexual Abuse Statistics

The prevalence of child sexual abuse is difficult to determine because it is often not reported; experts agree that the incidence is far greater than what is reported to authorities. CSA is also not uniformly defined, so statistics may vary. Statistics below represent some of the research done on child sexual abuse.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau report Child Maltreatment 2010 found that 9.2% of victimized children were sexually assaulted .

Studies by David Finkelhor, Director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center, show that:

· 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 20 boys is a victim of child sexual abuse;

· Self-report studies show that 20% of adult females and 5-10% of adult males recall a childhood sexual assault or sexual abuse incident;

· During a one-year period in the U.S., 16% of youth ages 14 to 17 had been sexually victimized;

· Over the course of their lifetime, 28% of U.S. youth ages 14 to 17 had been sexually victimized;

· Children are most vulnerable to CSA between the ages of 7 and 13.

According to a 2003 National Institute of Justice report, 3 out of 4 adolescents who have been sexually assaulted were victimized by someone they knew well .

A Bureau of Justice Statistics report shows 1.6 % (sixteen out of one thousand) of children between the ages of 12-17 were victims of rape/sexual assault .

A study conducted in 1986 found that 63% of women who had suffered sexual abuse by a family member also reported a rape or attempted rape after the age of 14. Recent studies in 2000, 2002, and 2005 have all concluded similar results .

Children who had an experience of rape or attempted rape in their adolescent years were 13.7 times more likely to experience rape or attempted rape in their first year of college .

A child who is the victim of prolonged sexual abuse usually develops low self-esteem, a feeling of worthlessness and an abnormal or distorted view of sex. The child may become withdrawn and mistrustful of adults, and can become suicidal .

Children who do not live with both parents as well as children living in homes marked by parental discord, divorce, or domestic violence, have a higher risk of being sexually abused .

In the vast majority of cases where there is credible evidence that a child has been penetrated, only between 5 and 15% of those children will have genital injuries consistent with sexual abuse .

Child sexual abuse is not solely restricted to physical contact; such abuse could include noncontact abuse, such as exposure, voyeurism, and child pornography .

Compared to those with no history of sexual abuse, young males who were sexually abused were five times more likely to cause teen pregnancy, three times more likely to have multiple sexual partners and two times more likely to have unprotected sex, according to the study published online and in the June print issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

DOMESTIC  VIOLENCE

In 1999 in the United States, 1,218 women and 424 men were killed by an intimate partner, and 1,181 females and 329 males were killed by their intimate partners in 2005. In 2007, 2,340 deaths were caused by intimate partner violence—making up 14% of all homicides. 70% of these deaths were females and 30% were males.

Domestic violence survivors are often portrayed in pop culture as beaten and battered women in low socioeconomic standing. But of course, that's not always the case. The reality is that intimate partner violence doesn't have a "face," because it can happen to anyone — your neighbor, your best friend, your coworker, your sibling, and so on.

Given that October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we've highlighted some standout statistics of its prevalence today, according to the National Domestic Violence HotlineSafe Horizon, the Centers for Disease Control, and several other studies and surveys. Taken together, these show how alarmingly widespread it is.

These numbers only tell part of the story, and every survivor's experience is different. But understanding their scope, like being able to spot the subtle signs of abuse, is an important step in raising awareness of this often silenced or misrepresented issue.

If you are experiencing domestic violence, please call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 or TTY 1-800-787-3224 for confidential support.